thatonegirludontknow:

Yeah folds yeah!!! Homework for clothed figure drawing. Drawing all these helped my understanding of folds a lot!
Everything except the first page was referenced from Barbara Bradley’s book, Drawing People. (A book that I recommend to all you aspiring artists!!!)

More resources, in case any of you are feeling inspired to tackle folds this week.

(via coffeeandcockatiels)

arbeartrarynonsense:

emmyc:

crowbara:

matuska:

wannabeanimator:

This is one of the best design lessons you can ever learn. Straights vs. curves.

gfghhff those illustrationsss hffff

i always keep this in mind when designing characters or just drawing anything. it really is one the best things you can ever know.

aaahhh!! So beautiful and insightful

excellent reference and like, stylistic variation hot damn

Oh my Veggites. How I have neglected you of late. But look! Useful resources.

Promise to post some new challenges someday soon.

chalkyhearts asked: Challenge: draw someone doing something but don't draw the thing they're doing. I'm obsessed with drawing as little as possible and still conveying a concept. Can I draw someone sitting in a chair, but not draw the chair, and still have it read properly? Can I draw someone on a bike, but not draw the bike and make it feel right? What about that guy over there? Can I distinguish between playing guitar and playing bass? I do this all the time and it's taught me a lot about weight and gesture.

Done and done! Veggites, start your pens.

spx:

Limber up and draw a movie, y’all.

storyshots:

Drawing from films

Drawing from films is a ridiculously useful exercise. It’s not enough to watch films; it’s not enough to look at someone else’s drawings from films. If you want to be in story, there’s no excuse for not doing this.

The way this works: you draw tons of tiny little panels, tiny enough that you won’t be tempted to fuss about drawing details. You put on a movie - I recommend Raiders, E.T., or Jaws… but honestly if there’s some other movie you love enough to freeze frame the shit out of, do what works for you. It’s good to do this with a movie you already know by heart.

Hit play. Every time there’s a cut, you hit pause, draw the frame, and hit play til it cuts again. If there’s a pan or camera move, draw the first and last frames.

Note on movies: Spielberg is great for this because he’s both evocative and efficient. Michael Bay is good at what he does, but part of what he does is cut so often that you will be sorry you picked his movie to draw from. Haneke is magnificent at what he does, but cuts so little that you will wind up with three drawings of a chair. Peter Jackson… he’s great, but not efficient. If you love a Spielberg movie enough to spend a month with it, do yourself a favor and use Spielberg.

What to look for:

  • Foreground, middle ground, background: where is the character? What is the point of the shot? What is it showing? What’s being used as a framing device? How does that help tie this shot into the geography of the scene? Is the background flat, or a location that lends itself to depth?
  • Composition: How is the frame divided? What takes up most of the space? How are the angles and lines in the shot leading your eye?
  • Reusing setups, economy: Does the film keep coming back to the same shot? The way liveaction works, that means they set up the camera and filmed one long take from that angle. Sometimes this includes a camera move, recomposing one long take into what look like separate shots. If you pay attention, you can catch them.
  • Camera position, angle, height: Is the camera fixed at shoulder height? Eye height? Sitting on the floor? Angled up? Down? Is it shooting straight on towards a wall, or at an angle? Does it favor the floor or the ceiling?
  • Lenses: wide-angle lens or long lens? Basic rule of thumb: If the character is large in frame and you can still see plenty of their surroundings, the lens is wide and the character is very close to camera. If the character’s surroundings seem to dwarf them, the lens is long (zoomed in).
  • Lighting: Notice it, but don’t draw it. What in the scene is lit? How is this directing your eye? How many lights? Do they make sense in the scene, or do they just FEEL right?

This seems like a lot to keep in mind, and honestly, don’t worry about any of that. Draw 100 thumbnails at a time, pat yourself on the back, and you will start to notice these things as you go.


Don’t worry about the drawings, either. You can see from my drawings that these aren’t for show. They’re notes to yourself. They’re strictly for learning. 

Now get out there and do a set! Tweet me at @lawnrocket and I’ll give you extra backpats for actually following through on it. Just be aware - your friends will look at you super weird when you start going off about how that one shot in Raiders was a pickup - it HAD to be - because it doesn’t make sense except for to string these other two shots together…

The Internet provideth!

Call for New Challenges!

Hi folks,

Due to overwhelming amounts of work, Artistic Veggies is taking a break for the next week or two — UNLESS you have magical challenge ideas waiting to be heard. 

This is an invitation to submit your drawing struggles to the common cause. I’ll be reposting submissions as they come in.

What’s your least favorite thing to draw? What are you working on improving right now? Include an example photo in your post and choose a reasonable number of drawings to complete in a week. Then we’ll take a stab at completing ‘em.

Looking forward to seeing your ideas!

My loyal followers, I give unto you THE GREATEST COLLECTION OF FASHIONABLE FOLDS IN THE HISTORY OF THE KNOWN WORLD.
Draw dat shit.
(via This Fashion Blog)

My loyal followers, I give unto you THE GREATEST COLLECTION OF FASHIONABLE FOLDS IN THE HISTORY OF THE KNOWN WORLD.

Draw dat shit.

(via This Fashion Blog)

"Did all 25 before I could stop myself. I guess I’ll…do some more?" - Lucy

"Did all 25 before I could stop myself. I guess I’ll…do some more?" - Lucy

New Challenge: 25 Drapery Studies
Trying not to dwell too heavily on Dürer’s absolute badassness in this area (and, let’s be honest, most areas), let’s focus on fabric this week. Capes, trousers, blankets, curtains, skirts — whatever you fancy. Explore light and shade, common fold shapes, stretch and compression. If you’re feeling daring, apply some of the high contrast work from last week.
Charge!

New Challenge: 25 Drapery Studies

Trying not to dwell too heavily on Dürer’s absolute badassness in this area (and, let’s be honest, most areas), let’s focus on fabric this week. Capes, trousers, blankets, curtains, skirts — whatever you fancy. Explore light and shade, common fold shapes, stretch and compression. If you’re feeling daring, apply some of the high contrast work from last week.

Charge!

"Another hard one, but great practice for spotting blacks." - Lucy

"Another hard one, but great practice for spotting blacks." - Lucy

Chewing through the tough bits of artistic practice, one body part at a time.

twitter.com/ArtVeggies

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